Saturday, March 26, 2011

Uh oh, the pledge and no American Flag ...

You know you're with a group of association executives when everyone has a story related to an error related to the American Flag:

1. Everyone stands to say the pledge at your meeting, and no American Flag present.

2. A military color guard arranged for a convention banquet. Ten minutes before the start it's determined the large chandelier in the middle of the room will not allow the flags to be at the required angle when entering the room. Banquet delayed half hour while new route for color guard entry determined and arranged.

3. Association president says "where's the flag?" in a committee meeting. Or you have a flag and the president says "where's the state flag?" Or you have both and the association president says "where's the association flag?"

4. Member informs you that the flags are placed incorrectly for the floor or the podium; and you genuinely have no idea if there are different podium rules.

5. You distribute flag lapel pins and learn there is a right and wrong way to wear those.


1. Carry a portable American flag to every meeting. Or have fold-up/desk-top size.

2. Ensure every meeting reminder list in your office includes the flag order, if there is a pledge at any time.

3. Keep a picture of an American Flag on your hard drive or on a zip drive. Pictures of flags do count as flags (Flag Code 3). Or find one online to post if equipment/projector already set up for other reasons.

4. Have the flag discussion (i.e., how many flags) at the start of the year with the President, along with discussion of other expectations. Those who feel strongly about three flags will let you know that.

5. Learn the flag placement rules for floors and podiums (Flag Code 7 k - American flag to speaker's right while facing the audience, other flag(s) to the left). Hotel set-up staff may get it wrong.

6. The flag is near your heart on a lapel pin.

1 comment:

David M. Patt, CAE said...

I've never worked for an association that used a flag on anything or said the pledge or played the national anthem. I don't think it's always necessary.